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Gum disease can be fatal for your dog

Gum disease can be fatal for your dog

Bacteria are the most common organisms on the planet and can be found everywhere, on every surface, tree, on human and canine bodies, but when they get under your dog’s gums in the form of plaque, they can lead to Gingivitis and other painful gum diseases.

“Most of what many people think they know about gum disease in dogs is wrong,” says Brook Niemiec, a veterinarian at Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery in San Diego. While many dog owners believe that tartar, a brown-colored coating on the teeth, causes Gingivitis, it actually does not, by itself. Owners will lift up a dog’s lip and look for tartar, but it is actually bacterial plaque that causes the gum disease, he says. However Tartar, which is just calcified, hardened plaque, does provide more hiding places for bacteria to thrive.

 These are the top five signs of gum disease in dogs:

 

Gingivitis. Symptoms of gingivitis include redness and swelling of the gums

Bad breath. Dog parents may notice that their dog has bad breath, which has been believed that was a normal thing at dogs. The most frequent cause of bad breath in dogs is dental disease.

Receding gums. A separation of the gums away from the teeth is a signal of gum disease. In the most advanced stage of the disease, the gum tissue will recede and expose the roots of the teeth.

Bleeding. If your dog’s gums bleed when he chew, it could be a sign of advanced periodontal disease

Loose teeth. This could be a sign of later stages of periodontal disease

 

Diagnosis and Treatment of Gum Disease in Dogs

If a dog’s gingivitis is diagnosed and treated before it advances to a full-scale periodontal disease, it can be reversible and fully cured.

But if gingivitis continues to advance, however, it could cause serious health consequences for your dog. 

As gingivitis advances into more serious periodontal disease, your pet will begin to lose bone and tissue surrounding the teeth and your veterinarian extract his teeth as last solution, because there is no cure when it reaches that point. Another thing that need to be be considered are the fractures of the jaw as a result of a weakened jaw bone, bone infection and the development of a fistula into the naval cavity, causing nasal discharge.

 

How to Prevent Gum Disease in Dogs

The number one way to prevent gum disease in dogs is to brush your dog’s teeth regularly. But as we know that brushing can be a real hassle it is recommended using a high quality organic silicone toothbrush toy, because as we know dogs love to chew stuff, that is their primal way of maintaining oral hygiene, strengthening and sharpening their teeth, maintaining their gums healthy and removing any food residue left  between their teeth. 

 

The next step in maintaining your dog’s oral health is scheduling a professional dental cleaning with a veterinarian which includes a cleaning under general anesthesia with scaling and polishing.

To keep your dog healthy and prevent forming a gum disease we highly recommend the Toothbrush Toy, which will encourage him with play and fun to clean his teeth every day.


4 Comment

  • My veterinarian told me that brushing my pup teeth twice a day will prevent any teeth diseases and gum inflammation he grow up, so I took his advice and I regularly take care of his overall hygiene

    Chris Nielsen
  • I completely agree, the gum disease in dogs can be a huge problem if not addressed on time

    Rachel M.
  • I have recently bought the Toothbrush Toy for my dog, he was diagnosed with a beginning phase of gingivitis, and wanted to try the product, his teeth and gums are a lot of healthier now, and the most important part, my dog is loving the teeth cleaning toy, he is playing and chewing it non stop, its has become his favourite toy,

    Sarah
  • This article was really helpful, I just determined my dog current health situation, I was not aware that his symptoms really are associated with a possible gum disease, thank you

    Nick Berrick

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